Uyghur Homeland, Chinese Frontier: The Xinjiang Work Forum and Centrally Led Development

UHRP, 27 June 2012

UAA-report-image1

UHRP – A new 37-page report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) examines the effects of the Xinjiang Work Forum, held in May 2010, which heralded an unprecedented state-led development push in East Turkestan. In this report, co-launched with the Unrepresented Nations and People’s Organization (UNPO), UHRP strives to provide an overview of the nature of development policies put in place in the two years since the Work Forum. Uyghur Homeland, Chinese Frontier: The Xinjiang Work Forum and Centrally Led Development considers the consequences of development that is mandated by leaders in Beijing in a region Uyghurs view as their home but Chinese view as territory vitally important to the economic growth of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

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Living on the Margins: The Chinese State’s Demolition of Uyghur Communities

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 2 April 2012

UHRP – This report documents the Chinese state’s top-down destruction of Uyghur communities in Kashgar and throughout East Turkestan, in a targeted and highly politicized push that Chinese officials have accelerated in the wake of turbulent unrest in the region in 2009. The destruction of Uyghur neighborhoods has resulted in the loss of both physical structures, including Uyghur homes, shops and religious sites, and patterns of traditional Uyghur life that cannot be replicated in the new, heavily-monitored apartment blocks where many have been forcibly relocated. This report does not discount the importance of providing modern structural amenities to Uyghurs.

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UHRP Report “They Can’t Send Me Back: Uyghur Asylum Seekers in Europe”

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 20 September 2011

UHRP — A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) published on 20 September 2011 documents the challenges faced by Uyghur asylum seekers in Europe, and examines the reasons why they fled East Turkestan (otherwise known as Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China) or Central Asia. They Can’t Send Me Back: Uyghur Asylum Seekers in Europe is based on interviews UHRP researchers conducted with 50 Uyghur asylum seekers in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands in 2010 and 2011.

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UHRP Report: “Offers They Can’t Refuse: China’s Relations with the Muslim World”

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 12 September 2011

A new report, “Offers They Can’t Refuse: China’s Relations with the Muslim World”, published on 12 September 2011, examines the Chinese government’s relationships with the governments of predominantly Muslim countries, and how these relationships have muted the Muslim world’s response to China’s repression of the Uyghur people.

Written by Uyghur Human Rights Project intern Jessica Smith, the 24-page report provides insight into the factors motivating Muslim countries to preserve and enhance strong ties to China while remaining silent about human rights abuses that have intensified in the wake of July 5, 2009 unrest in East Turkestan. In light of China’s recent intensified push to expand trade and diplomatic links with Muslim countries on its borders and beyond, it is particularly important to explore the context behind Sino-Muslim partnerships, which appear likely to grow even further in the foreseeable future.

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UHRP Report “A city ruled by fear and silence: Urumchi, two years on”

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 5 July 2011

A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) published on 5 July 2011 examines the nature of post-July 5, 2009 detentions and criminal procedures in East Turkestan (also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR, in the People’s Republic of China). The report looks at the Chinese government’s portrayal of July 5, and contrasts this with information, including newly emerged videos and eyewitness testimonies, that contradicts the official depiction of events. It also examines the ways in which Chinese officials have responded to Uyghur calls for protection from the state, and the state’s active inflammation of ethnic tensions.

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CAN ANYONE HEAR US? VOICES FROM THE 2009 UNREST IN URUMCHI

Press Release — For immediate release
1 July 2010
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or [email protected]

A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) examines the unrest that took place in July and September 2009 in Urumchi, the regional capital of East Turkestan (also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR) through the accounts of Uyghur eyewitnesses. Can Anyone Hear Us? Voices From The 2009 Unrest In Urumchi also investigates the economic, social and political factors that set the context for the unrest, as well as the information lockdown that followed.

Residents of Urumchi who spoke to UHRP have described witnessing security forces’ use of deadly live fire against Uyghur demonstrators on July 5, extensive beatings of Uyghurs by civilians in July and September and arbitrary detentions that have exacerbated the growing divide between the Uyghur and Han communities. The accounts provided to UHRP cast sufficient doubt on the Chinese government version of events that should compel an independent and international investigation into the unrest.

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Uyghurs As Indigenous People; A New UHRP Report Highlights Chinese Government Violations of Uyghurs’ Indigenous Rights

Press Release — For immediate release
5 October 2009
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or [email protected]rg

Sixty years after the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), more than six decades have passed since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, the unrest that has taken place in East Turkestan since July 5, 2009, stands as a grim reminder that Uyghurs in East Turkestan continue to experience human rights abuses in nearly every aspect of their lives. Sixty years of Communist rule have left Uyghurs a voiceless, powerless population in their traditional homeland, despite official guarantees regarding the implementation of autonomy. A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) details the PRC’s violations of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in the case of the Uyghur people.

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Separate and Unequal: The Status of Development in East Turkestan

Press Release — For immediate release
28 September 2009
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or [email protected]

October 1, 2009 will mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and officials from Beijing to East Turkestan are pulling out all the stops to ensure that no discord mars the scripted celebrations that will take place. The year 2009 in East Turkestan marks one of the most turbulent periods in the region in modern history, with unrest, state brutality and ethnic violence exposing deep social rifts and grossly flawed government policies. More than 130,000 troops have been specially deployed to East Turkestan from other regions of China in a bid to restore order and crack down on the Uyghur population, following an untold number of deaths and injuries that began on July 5, 2009.

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