The World Uyghur Congress and Uyghur Human Rights Project Issue Alternative Report to the Committee Against Torture

Press Release – For immediate release
2 November 2015
Contact: World Uyghur Congress
 www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

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WUC & UHRP  Ahead of China’s review of its 5th Periodic Report to the Committee Against Torture, the World Uyghur Congress (WUC) and the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) have jointly submitted an alternative report for consideration by the Committee that aims to provide additional and alternative information  regarding the continued use of torture, particularly against Uyghur detainees in East Turkestan.

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Trapped in a Virtual Cage: Chinese State Repression of Uyghurs Online

UHRP, 16 June 2014

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A new report from the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) details the Chinese government’s severe restrictions placed on Uyghur Internet users. Trapped in a Virtual Cage: Chinese State Repression of Uyghurs Online documents how Chinese authorities have exerted effective control over how Uyghurs seek, receive and impart information online in East Turkestan by employing technical and legislative strategies, as well as the use of the criminal justice system to create an atmosphere of fear, intimidation and self-censorship. UHRP interviewed a number of Uyghurs versed in the Internet culture of East Turkestan, experts on Chinese Internet censorship, as well as regular Uyghur users of the Internet in compiling the report.

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Rumors, Suspicion and Hysteria: Urumchi’s Han Residents Target Uyghurs in September 2009 Pinprick Attack Scare

UHRP, 18 September 2013

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UHRP – Rumors, Suspicion and Hysteria, a new report from the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP), details the events of late August and early September 2009 in which a series of alleged pinprick attacks shook the regional capital of East Turkestan, Urumchi. The little documented incident gave rise to a series of human rights violations against the Uyghur people that demonstrate the vulnerability of Uyghurs in contemporary China. Allegations that Chinese officials did not investigate credible accounts of killings and beating of Uyghurs during September 2009 are of particular concern. The lack of due process in trials of Uyghurs alleged of conducting pinprick attacks also indicate an absence of international human rights standards for Uyghurs in China.

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To Strike The Strongest Blow: Questions Remain Over Crackdown On 2009 Unrest In Urumchi

UHRP, 2 July 2013

uhrp-report-20130702UHRP – A new report from the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP), To Strike The Strongest Blow: Questions Remain Over Crackdown On 2009 Unrest In Urumchi, details widespread human rights violations committed by the People’s Republic of China in the wake of unrest in Urumchi on July 5, 2009.

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Sacred Right Defiled: China’s Iron-Fisted Repression of Uyghur Religious Freedom

UHRP, 30 April 2013

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UHRP – A new report from the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) details the repression of religious freedom among Uyghurs in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). “State persecution of Uyghur religious practice in China has increased tremendously in recent years, and this report illustrates how Uyghurs’ fundamental right to freedom of religion is denied by Chinese authorities,” said UHRP Director Alim Seytoff. Based on interviews with Uyghur witnesses to repression of religious freedom in East Turkestan, government documents, and reports from media, human rights groups, and academic observers, Sacred Right Defiled is the first systematic documentation of the repression of Uyghur religion published by a human rights group since 2005, and focuses on recent developments since that time.

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Uyghur Homeland, Chinese Frontier: The Xinjiang Work Forum and Centrally Led Development

UHRP, 27 June 2012

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UHRP – A new 37-page report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) examines the effects of the Xinjiang Work Forum, held in May 2010, which heralded an unprecedented state-led development push in East Turkestan. In this report, co-launched with the Unrepresented Nations and People’s Organization (UNPO), UHRP strives to provide an overview of the nature of development policies put in place in the two years since the Work Forum. Uyghur Homeland, Chinese Frontier: The Xinjiang Work Forum and Centrally Led Development considers the consequences of development that is mandated by leaders in Beijing in a region Uyghurs view as their home but Chinese view as territory vitally important to the economic growth of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

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Living on the Margins: The Chinese State’s Demolition of Uyghur Communities

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 2 April 2012

UHRP – This report documents the Chinese state’s top-down destruction of Uyghur communities in Kashgar and throughout East Turkestan, in a targeted and highly politicized push that Chinese officials have accelerated in the wake of turbulent unrest in the region in 2009. The destruction of Uyghur neighborhoods has resulted in the loss of both physical structures, including Uyghur homes, shops and religious sites, and patterns of traditional Uyghur life that cannot be replicated in the new, heavily-monitored apartment blocks where many have been forcibly relocated. This report does not discount the importance of providing modern structural amenities to Uyghurs.

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UHRP Report “They Can’t Send Me Back: Uyghur Asylum Seekers in Europe”

Uyghur Human Rights Project, 20 September 2011

UHRP — A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) published on 20 September 2011 documents the challenges faced by Uyghur asylum seekers in Europe, and examines the reasons why they fled East Turkestan (otherwise known as Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China) or Central Asia. They Can’t Send Me Back: Uyghur Asylum Seekers in Europe is based on interviews UHRP researchers conducted with 50 Uyghur asylum seekers in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands in 2010 and 2011.

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