Deception, Pressure, and Threats: The Transfer of Young Uyghur Women to Eastern China

Press Release — For immediate release
8 December 2008
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project examines a recently implemented People’s Republic of China (PRC) policy that recruits young Uyghur women from majority Uyghur areas of East Turkestan (also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR) and transfers them to work in factories in urban areas of eastern China.

The report, Deception, Pressure, and Threats: The Transfer of Young Uyghur Women to Eastern China, reveals that, less than two years after the initiation of the transfer policy, it has already left a history of broken promises and shattered families.

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Political Persecution of Uyghurs in the Era of the “War on Terror”

World Uyghur Congress16 October 2007

Political Persecution of Uyghurs in the Era of the “War on Terror”

Over the past six years, PRC officials have maneuvered to use the concept of “terrorism” as a justification for their repressive treatment of Uyghurs in East Turkestan1 (also known as Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR) and to intimidate Uyghurs who have fled China.

The report can be read in full here.

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Uyghur Language Under Attack: The Myth of “Bilingual” Education in the People’s

World Uyghur Congress, 24 July 2007

Uyghur language is under attack in East Turkestan (also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR). In the past decade, and with increasing intensity since 2002, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has pursued assimilationist policies aimed at removing Uyghur as a language of instruction in East Turkestan.

The report can be read in full here.

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WUC – UNPO Report: Uyghur Leadership Training Seminar 2007 (The Hague, Netherlands)

World Uyghur Congress, 11 May 2007

This report is the result of the “Uyghur Leadership Training Seminar” held from 6 – 10 May 2007 in The Hague, Netherlands. The seminar was jointly organised by the WUC and the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO), and funded by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).

In addition to promoting the Uyghur cause during the event itself, the core objective was to enable present and future Uyghur leaders to become themselves more effective international proponents of their rights.

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China: Minority Exclusion, Marginalization and Rising Tensions

Minority Rights Group, 1 January 2007 

Minority Rights Group — China’s increasing engagement with the international community in recent years has been accompanied by rapid domestic social and economic changes. Although the People’s Republic of China (PRC) is now an active participant in multilateral forums and processes of international human rights law, its policies continue to undermine human rights, especially that of vulnerable populations.

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UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Concludes Two-Week Visit to China

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 22 May 2006

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CECC — Manfred Nowak, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, concluded his two-week visit to China and confirmed allegations that “the practice of torture, though on the decline – particularly in urban areas – remains widespread in China,” according to a December 2 press release available through the Web site of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

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Devastating Blows: Religious Repression of Uighurs in Xinjiang

Human Rights Watch, 11 April 2005

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This 114-page report is based on previously undisclosed Communist Party and government documents, as well as local regulations, official newspaper accounts, and interviews conducted in Xinjiang. It unveils for the first time the complex architecture of law, regulation, and policy in Xinjiang that denies Uighurs religious freedom, and by extension freedom of association, assembly, and expression. Chinese policy and law enforcement stifle religious activity and thought even in school and at home.

Read the report here.

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The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse

The East-West Center, 1 January 2005

By Arienne M. Dwyer — This study explores Chinese language policy and language use in Inner Asia, as well as the relation of language policy to the politics of Uyghur identity. Language is central to ethnic identity, and official language policies are often overlooked as critical factors in conflict over ethnic nationalism. In Chinese Inner Asia, any solution to ethnic conflict will include real linguistic and cultural autonomy for major ethnic groups.

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