2nd Anniversary of the 5 July 2009 Events – Join the Protest Actions of the World Uyghur Congress!

Press release – For immediate release
30 June 2011
Contact:  World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
Tel. 0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or e-mail contact@uyghurcongress.or

The World Uyghur Congress (WUC) and its member organizations will stage protest actions around the globe on July 5, 2011 and in the days surrounding July 5th to commemorate the second anniversary of one of the saddest and most tragic days in the history of the Uyghur people and of East Turkestan and to ensure that the world does not forget about the devastating plight of the Uyghur people.

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China’s ‘full’ democracy in doubt

The Province, 29 June 2011
By Malcolm Moore

PM’s promise rings hollow as Communist Party orders suppression

A pledge by Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao to bring “full” democracy to China has been cast into doubt by the leak of internal Communist Party documents that apparently order the party to tighten its control on the country.

Wen, who was in Germany as part of his European tour Tuesday, promised in London that “tomorrow’s China will be a country that fully achieves democracy, the rule of law, fairness and justice.”

However, 60 pages of internal Communist documents that allegedly detail the party’s efforts to suppress democratic forces were published by Information, a Danish newspaper.

The documents also allegedly contradict the party’s claim that it does not exercise any censorship, by apparently ordering cadres to make sure that “politically sensitive information” is “blocked,” “destroyed,” or “cleansed” from the Internet, the media and books.

“In particular, crackdowns must be imposed on any aggression directed against the party and its leaders as well as against the promotion of other political systems and a free press,” one document said, according to the newspaper.

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China says will be friends with Sudan no matter what

Reuters, 29 June 2011
By Ben Blanchard and Michael Martina

Chinese President Hu Jintao said on Wednesday that relations with Sudan would remain good no matter what changes may occur as the African nation prepares for its south to secede.

Hu told Sudan’s war crimes-indicted President Omar Hassan al-Bashir that China hoped north and south Sudan could resolve their problems through dialogue and become friendly neighbours.

“China upholds a friendly policy towards Sudan, and this policy will not change regardless of changes internationally or in Sudan’s domestic situation,” state news agency Xinhua paraphrased Hu as saying.

Chinese officials have said that talks during the visit would take up the July 9 planned secession of south Sudan, a split that will see the northern government in the capital of Khartoum lose three-quarters of the country’s oil output of about 500,000 barrels a day.

China is a major buyer of Sudanese crude oil, and is keen to ensure the partition of Sudan into two states will not descend into fighting that could disrupt supplies and damage Beijing’s stake on both sides of the new border.

Bashir, who called Hu his “friend and brother”, said Sudan hoped to maintain stability between the north and south of the country, Xinhua quoted him as saying.

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Awkward moment as Merkel broaches human rights with China

DW-World, 28 June 2011

Merkel walked a thin line on Tuesday as she attempted to support Germany’s business interests in China, while ramping up the pressure on Beijing to improve its human rights record.

Despite both sides offering up lengthy paeans to the excellent relations between China and Germany, there was one awkward moment at Tuesday’s joint press conference in Berlin.

Just as Chancellor Angela Merkel began to address the issue of human rights, the Chinese premier Wen Jiabao indicated he could no longer hear the translation. Wen jerked on his headphones several times, gesturing that he could no longer follow the Chancellor. It took Merkel a few false starts to express her happiness over the release of dissidents Hua Jia and Ai Weiwei.

Human Rights on the Agenda

“What’s important now is that there is a transparent procedure for Ai Weiwei,” Merkel said of the internationally acclaimed artist, imprisoned for two and a half months at an undisclosed location on charges of tax evasion.

Activist artist Ai Weiwei speaks to journalists gathered outside his home Activist artist Ai Weiwei returned home late Wednesday

“On some issues, we still have a long road ahead of us,” Merkel said, citing “the implementation of constitutional procedures” and “better working conditions for foreign journalists in China” as examples.

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Wen spreads China’s billions in Europe but can’t buy goodwill

The Christian Science Monitor, 28 June 2011
By Robert Marquand

On tour through Europe, which ended today in Germany, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao inked deals worth billions, but also faced questions on human rights abuses.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao today said China may give Europe “a helping hand” with its current debt crisis – but warned in uncharacteristic tones for a second successive day against European officials and media that “meddle” in China’s affairs.

Mr. Wen, seen as one of China’s more liberal and sympathetic senior officials, ended a goodwill jaunt through Europe that is partly intended to put a better face on China, experts say, and meant to keep Sino-European business flowing during a US election season that could result in significant China-bashing.

His trip included a stop in Hungary, head of Europe’s rotating presidency, where he offered $1.4 billion in loans. A visit to England showcased Wen’s interest in Shakespeare, and brought $2.3 billion in trade deals. In Germany, a nation that designs many of the machine tools China has used to become the “factory of the world,” trade deals totaled more than $14 billion.

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China’s pledge for ‘democracy’ contradicted by internal documents

The Telegraph, 28 June 2011
By Malcolm Moore

A pledge by Wen Jiabao, the Chinese premier, to bring “full” democracy to China has been undermined by the leak of internal Communist party documents ordering the party to tighten its control on the country.

Mr Wen, who was in Germany for the latest leg of his European tour, promised in London that “tomorrow’s China will be a country that fully achieves democracy, the rule of law, fairness and justice”.

However a 60 page of internal Communist documents was yesterday publish that details the party’s efforts to suppress the rise of democratic forces.

The documents also allegedly contradict the Communist party’s claim that it does not exercise any censorship, ordering cadres to make sure that “politically sensitive information” is “blocked”, “destroyed”, or “cleansed” from the Internet, the media and books.

“In particular, crackdowns must be imposed on any aggression directed against the party and its leaders as well as against the promotion of other political systems and a free press,” one document said, according to the newspaper.

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Freed critics not a sign China is soft on dissent

Associated Press, 28 June 2011
By GILLIAN WONG

BEIJING (AP) — Despite recent releases of high-profile critics, China’s authoritarian government seems as determined as ever to silence dissidents and run roughshod over their thin legal protections, activists and academics said Monday.

Sunday’s scheduled release of the prominent activist Hu Jia from a Beijing prison came days after outspoken Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was freed after nearly three months in detention.

A major figure in China’s dissident community, Hu advocated a broad range of civil liberties before he was imprisoned in 2008. Ai was the most high-profile target of a sweeping crackdown on activists that started in February in a bid to prevent protests similar to those in the Middle East and North Africa.

Activists welcomed the releases but said the international community should not take the developments as signs of softening in the government’s attitude toward its critics, noting that Hu was freed only after he had completed his 3 1/2-year sentence for sedition. Ai was never formally indicted and was mysteriously released under a form of bail that restricts suspects’ movements to their home city for one year.

Activists also note that many once-vocal activist lawyers and dissidents who were rounded up in the government crackdown that started in February have been silent since their release. Ai told reporters last week that the conditions of his release mean he cannot give any interviews or say anything about his case.

Many petitioners and other activists also continue to be rounded up routinely, they said.

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Uyghur Leaders Again Barred from Travelling Abroad

Press Release – For immediate release
27 June 2011
Contact:  World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

Two prominent members of the exiled Uyghur community in Pakistan have again been barred from travelling abroad. The brothers Akbar and Omer Osman, who co-founded a charity to teach Pakistani Uyghurs their own language in the northern city of Rawalpindi, planned to fly to Istanbul on 17 June 2011 to attend the one week conference “East Turkestan Brothers’ Union Summit” organized by Uyghur groups in Turkey. However, at Islamabad´s airport Pakistani authorities told them that they were not allowed to travel abroad. Since that day, police is closely monitoring every movement of the two brothers and policemen have been stationed in front of their homes.

Akbar said in an interview with Radio Free Asia that he and his brother had obtained visas, received their boarding passes, and had even checked in their luggage before they were approached by flight attendants and told they could not board. On 21 June, the brothers traveled to Pakistan’s Ministry of Interior to ask why they had been banned from international travel and they were told that the Chinese embassy in Islamabad had demanded to block their travel plans. When they asked the Pakistani officials on how they might be removed from the no-fly list, they were told they should go to the Chinese embassy in Islamabad and get a letter from them before they would take their names off the no-fly list. However, both Akbar  and Omer, who are Pakistani citizens who had been born and raised in the country, refuse to  follow Chinese demands and will instead fight the decision to place them on the no-fly list at the Pakistani Supreme Court and are preparing an appeal.

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