Weekly Brief December 29th

World Uyghur Congress, 29 December 2017

Collection of DNA from Uyghur People by Chinese Authorities a Major Concern

As was reported in the Pacific Standard Magazine, the actions taken by the Chinese government to gather DNA and biometric data from the Uyghur people, Chinese dissidents and other ethnic populations should be a major concern for all of the world’s citizens. The mass collection of biometric data is being used to create a massive database to more easily monitor and control the Uyghur population and to silence dissenters. This is being done on an unprecedented scale and has been assisted by an American firm Thermo Fischer Scientific. This dystopian and repressive approach will surely have impacts beyond those on the Uyghur and Chinese populations. The rest of the world should be very concerned about what is occurring, as other repressive government may soon follow China’s example.

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AMERICANS SHOULD BE CONCERNED ABOUT CHINA’S LATEST PRIVACY VIOLATION

Pacific Standard, 21 December 2017

By Massoud Hayoun – Local governments in the far-Western Chinese region of Xinjiang began collecting biometric data from residents in February, Human Rights Watch reported last week. The HRW report cites directives found primarily on local government websites, some of which have since been taken down. The biometric data included DNA samples, fingerprints, and iris scans, often collected during physical examinations, billed to the public as a social benefit designed to uplift the region’s economically distressed residents.

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China to Punish ‘Two-Faced’ Uyghur Officials in New Reward Scheme

Radio Free Asia, 26 December 2017

By Shohret Hoshur – Rewards provided by authorities in northwest China’s Xinjiang region to tipsters for outing would-be “terrorists” are also being offered to those reporting ethnic Uyghur officials and public figures suspected of “disloyalty” to Beijing, according to sources.

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China collecting DNA, biometrics from millions in Xinjiang: report

CNN,  13 December 2017

By James Griffiths – Authorities in China’s far-west are collecting DNA samples, fingerprints, eye scans and blood types of millions of people aged 12 to 65, according to a new Human Rights Watch (HRW) report.

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China Expands Recall of Passports to Uyghurs Outside of Xinjiang

Radio Free Asia, 8 December 2017

Authorities in China have expanded a recall of passports from Uyghurs residing within the northwest region of Xinjiang to include members of the ethnic groups throughout the country, according to sources.

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Weekly Brief November 24th

World Uyghur Congress, 24 November 2017

WUC Expresses Concern Over Uyghurs Who Recently Escaped from Thai Immigration Detention Facility

The World Uyghur Congress issued a press release expressing its deep concerned over the treatment of Uyghurs who had recently escaped their immigration detention facility in southern Thailand. Consistent rhetoric from China has framed all Uyghurs escaping the country as criminals who should be immediately returned, renewing fears that Thailand may submit to such pressure, as in the past.

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China: Police ‘Big Data’ Systems Violate Privacy, Target Dissent

Human Rights Watch, 19 November 2017

By Human Rights Watch – The Chinese government should stop building big data policing platforms that aggregate and analyze massive amounts of citizens’ personal information, Human Rights Watch said today. This abusive “Police Cloud” system is designed to track and predict the activities of activists, dissidents, and ethnic minorities, including those authorities say have “extreme thoughts,” among other functions.

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Xinjiang Residents Told to Hand Over ‘Two-Faced’ Officials

Radio Free Asia, 3 November 2017

By Kurban Niyaz – Authorities in northwestern China’s Xinjiang are urging citizens to turn in ethnic Uyghur workers in government and other public sectors suspected of disloyalty toward Chinese policies in the politically sensitive region, sources say.

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