China’s Domestic Security Spending: An Analysis of Available Data

The Jamestown Foundation, 12 March 2018

By Adrian Zenz – On February 1, 2018, China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) revealed a stunning 92.8 percent increase in its domestic security spending: from 30.05 billion RMB in 2016 to 57.95 billion RMB in 2017 (Xinjiang Net, 3 February). Within a decade, this figure has increased nearly ten-fold, up from 5.45 billion RMB in 2007.

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Beijing is spending its way to ‘an experiment of what is possible’ to police Xinjiang’s Uyghurs

Globe and Mail, 8 March 2018

By Nathan Vanderklippe – Security spending in China’s far western Xinjiang region nearly doubled last year and now far exceeds what is spent on health care or social welfare in a place where authorities have responded harshly to threats of terrorism among the largely Muslim Uyghur population.

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Exiled Uyghur Leader Says ‘Red Notice’ Demonstrates China’s Harassment of Critics Abroad

Radio Free Asia,  7 March 2018

By Kurban Niyaz – Prominent exiled Uyghur activist Dolkun Isa said Wednesday that a “Red Notice” alert for his arrest, which was recently removed by international policing organization INTERPOL, is “just one example” of how China’s government is using the alleged threat of terrorism to silence its critics around the world.

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Press Conference Announcement: WUC President to Speak at National Press Club in Washington D.C. on March 7th

World Uyghur Congress, 6 March 2018

On March 7th, the World Uyghur Congress and the Uyghur Human Rights Project will convene a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. at 12:30 PM. The press conference will feature WUC President Dolkun Isa, who will discuss the recent announcement from INTERPOL that it had deleted the ‘red notice’ on his name after important work from the UK-based organisation, Fair Trials, showed the notice to be politically motivated and the Chinese allegations of criminality unsubstantiated.

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China upset as Interpol removes wanted alert for exiled Uighur leader

Reuters, 24 February 2018

By Ben Blanchard – China expressed dissatisfaction on Saturday at Interpol’s decision to lift a wanted alert for an exile from its Uighur minority, a man China accuses of being a terrorist.

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In Xinjiang and Tibet, Police Surveillance ‘Exceeds East Germany’

China Policy Institute, 14 February 2018

By Adrian Zenz – In 2000, Borge Bakken argued that China has “never been a ‘police state’ if we define that term as the number of police per population”. Based on data from 1992, Bakken noted that China’s per capita police count stood at only half of the world average. Most rural areas did not have a single police officer. In regards to China’s far western region of Xinjiang, defence expert Yitzhak Shichor wrote in 2004 that Chinese security forces were “quantitatively and qualitatively inadequate to cope with emergencies.” A surprising assessment, considering that after the September 11, 2001, terror attack on the World Trade Centre, China had launched its own “war on terror” against Uyghur Muslim separatism in Xinjiang. During the July 2009 Urumqi riots, however, the state was forced to scramble commercial aeroplanes to fly in security forces from all over China in order to prevent the unrest from spinning out of control.

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Xinjiang Authorities Launch Anti-Religion Campaign Through Local Police Stations

Radio Free Asia, 12 February 2018

By Shohret Hoshur – Authorities in Kashgar (in Chinese, Kashi), in northwest China’s Xinjiang region, have launched an anti-religion propaganda drive through local police stations, whose officers are rolling the campaign out to residents of the mostly ethnic Uyghur-populated prefecture, sources said.

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Chinese Police Add Facial-Recognition Glasses to Surveillance Arsenal

Washington Post, 8 February 2018

By Josh Chin – As hundreds of millions of Chinese begin traveling for the Lunar New Year holiday, police are showing off a new addition to their crowd-surveillance toolbox: mobile facial-recognition units mounted on eyeglasses.

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