Xinjiang Draft Legal Measures Promote Hiring Ethnic Minorities, Against Track Record of Employment Discrimination

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 18 November 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — New draft measures on employment promotion, under consideration in Xinjiang, stipulate measures to prevent discrimination and promote the hiring of non-Han (“ethnic minority”) groups in the region. The measures track China’s national employment promotion law, but also stipulate subsidies for hiring ethnic minorities. Such subsidies are absent in the national law and employment promotion regulations in other provincial-level areas.

Continue Reading →

Uyghur Political Prisoners Mehbube Ablesh’s and Abdulghani Memetemin’s Prison Sentences Expire

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 18 October 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — The prison sentences of two Uyghur political prisoners in Xinjiang have expired, and both are presumed to have since been released. Mehbube Ablesh completed a three-year prison sentence for “splittism” around August 2011. Authorities handed down the prison sentence in apparent connection to her criticism of Chinese government policies, including Mandarin-focused “bilingual” education. Abdulghani Memetemin completed a nine-year prison sentence in late July for “supplying state secrets” to an overseas group.

Continue Reading →

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China issued its 2011 Annual Report on human rights conditions and the development of the rule of law in China

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 10 October 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — The China of today is vastly different from that of 30  years ago, when major economic reforms began, and even 10 years  ago, when China acceded to the World Trade Organization. More  people in today’s China enjoy an improved quality of life,  economic freedoms, and greater access to information via the  Internet and other communication technologies. But economic and  technological progress has not led to commensurate gains in  China’s human rights and rule of law record.

Continue Reading →

Ethnic Minority Population Planning Program Expands to More Areas in Xinjiang

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 3 June 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — Authorities in the far western region of Xinjiang have expanded a program that rewards ethnic minority couples for having fewer children than permitted under the region’s regulation on population planning, now making the program applicable to all counties and cities in Xinjiang where rural ethnic minorities comprise 50 percent or more of the population.

Continue Reading →

U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF): 2011 Annual Report

United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, 28 April 2011

USCIRF — The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) released its 2011 Annual Report and recommended that the Secretary of State name the following nations “countries of particular concern” or CPCs:  Burma, China, Egypt, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. CPCs are nations whose conduct marks them as the world’s worst religious freedom violators and human rights abusers.

The 1998 International Religious Freedom Act (IRFA) requires that the United States designate annually as CPCs countries whose governments have engaged in or tolerated systematic and egregious violations of the universal right to freedom of religion or belief.  USCIRF’s Annual Report assesses conditions in these and other nations and provides policy prescriptions tailored to each CPC.

Continue Reading →

FREEDOM ON THE NET 2011: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media

Freedom House, 18 April 2011

Freedom House — In order to illuminate the emerging threats to internet freedom and identify areas of opportunity, Freedom House created a unique methodology to assess the full range of elements that comprise digital media freedom.

This report examines internet freedom in 37 countries around the globe. The study’s findings indicate that the threats to internet freedom are growing and have become more diverse. Cyber attacks, politically-motivated censorship, and government control over internet infrastructure have emerged as especially prominent threats.

The chapter on China is available here.

The full report can be downloaded here.

Continue Reading →

CECC: Xinjiang Authorities Target Religious and Political Publications in Censorship Campaigns

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 31 March 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — Local governments in the far western region of Xinjiang carried out a series of censorship campaigns in 2010 and early 2011. The work follows a national campaign to “Sweep Away Pornography and Strike Down Illegal Publications,” but with special emphasis on religious and political publications, along with “reactionary materials” connected to groups perceived to threaten Xinjiang’s stability.

Continue Reading →

CECC: Job Discrimination Against Ethnic Minorities Continues in East Turkestan

Congressional-Executive Commission on China, 31 March 2011

us-congress-china-tibet-2016

CECC — Hiring practices that discriminate against Uyghurs and other groups by reserving positions exclusively for Han Chinese have continued in Xinjiang in the past year. The Congressional-Executive Commission on China found recent job recruiting announcements that reserved some or all positions for Han, in contravention of provisions in Chinese law.

Continue Reading →