CAN ANYONE HEAR US? VOICES FROM THE 2009 UNREST IN URUMCHI

Press Release — For immediate release
1 July 2010
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) examines the unrest that took place in July and September 2009 in Urumchi, the regional capital of East Turkestan (also known as the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region or XUAR) through the accounts of Uyghur eyewitnesses. Can Anyone Hear Us? Voices From The 2009 Unrest In Urumchi also investigates the economic, social and political factors that set the context for the unrest, as well as the information lockdown that followed.

Residents of Urumchi who spoke to UHRP have described witnessing security forces’ use of deadly live fire against Uyghur demonstrators on July 5, extensive beatings of Uyghurs by civilians in July and September and arbitrary detentions that have exacerbated the growing divide between the Uyghur and Han communities. The accounts provided to UHRP cast sufficient doubt on the Chinese government version of events that should compel an independent and international investigation into the unrest.

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After the disturbances in Urumqi: Persecution of Uyghurs in China continues

Society for Threatened Peoples, 1 May 2010

Society for Threatened Peoples — Eight months after the disturbances in Urumqi of July 2009 the real extent of the sometimes violent conflicts between Uyghurs, Han Chinese and the government security forces is still not clear. China’s authorities refuse all independent investigations into what happened, the background and the consequences of the most serious conflict for decades in Xinjiang (East Turkestan). In this report the events will be reconstructed on the basis of eye-witness reports and the background to the conflicts.

It is clear that the protests of the Uyghurs were at the outset peaceful and that they were stirred up by the government censure and the arbitrary action of the security forces. It is still not clear how many people were the victims of the bloody conflicts. Crimes and offences committed in the disturbances must be prosecuted quite apart from the ethnic origin of the criminals. Up to now however the legal treatment of the events has been totally inadequate. The defendants have been refused a free choice of legal representation and the lawyers have been intimidated and threatened. In the court cases all principles of fair trials have been ignored.

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UNPO – WUC Report: Repression in China- Roots and Repercussions of the Urumqi Unrest

WUC/UNPO, 13 November 2009

On 13 November 2009, the UNPO and the WUC published a report entitled “Repression in China: Roots and Repercussions of the Urumqi Unrest”.

The report outlines the events that took place in Shaoguan and Urumqi this summer in which hundreds of people were killed. It also issues a series of recommendations for future action to assuage the resentment and mistrust that has been allowed to develop in East Turkestan over the past five decades as a result of policies pursued by the Chinese government.

The report can be downloaded here.

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Kazakhstan/ Kyrgyzstan: Exploitation of migrant workers, protection denied to asylum seekers and refugees

International Federation for Human Rights, 30 October 2009

International Federation for Human Rights — The report sets out the findings of an investigative mission conducted by FIDH in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan in June 2009, which documented the situation of migrant workers, asylum seekers and refugees in both countries. The mission took place within the framework of FIDH’s actions aimed at the promotion and protection of migrants’ rights in the region.

As Kazakhstan prepares to take the Chair of the OSCE in January 2010, FIDH highlights the reforms urgently required to ensure that migrant workers and refugees receive the protection to which they are entitled under international law.

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“We Are Afraid to Even Look for Them”: Enforced Disappearances in the Wake of Xinjiang’s Protests

Human Rights Watch, 20 October 2016

Human Rights Watch — This 44-page report documents the enforced disappearances of 43 Uighur men and teenage boys who were detained by Chinese security forces in the wake of the protests.

You can read the report here.

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Uyghurs As Indigenous People; A New UHRP Report Highlights Chinese Government Violations of Uyghurs’ Indigenous Rights

Press Release — For immediate release
5 October 2009
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

Sixty years after the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), more than six decades have passed since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, the unrest that has taken place in East Turkestan since July 5, 2009, stands as a grim reminder that Uyghurs in East Turkestan continue to experience human rights abuses in nearly every aspect of their lives. Sixty years of Communist rule have left Uyghurs a voiceless, powerless population in their traditional homeland, despite official guarantees regarding the implementation of autonomy. A new report by the Uyghur Human Rights Project (UHRP) details the PRC’s violations of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in the case of the Uyghur people.

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Separate and Unequal: The Status of Development in East Turkestan

Press Release — For immediate release
28 September 2009
Contact: World Uyghur Congress www.uyghurcongress.org
0049 (0) 89 5432 1999 or contact@uyghurcongress.org

October 1, 2009 will mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and officials from Beijing to East Turkestan are pulling out all the stops to ensure that no discord mars the scripted celebrations that will take place. The year 2009 in East Turkestan marks one of the most turbulent periods in the region in modern history, with unrest, state brutality and ethnic violence exposing deep social rifts and grossly flawed government policies. More than 130,000 troops have been specially deployed to East Turkestan from other regions of China in a bid to restore order and crack down on the Uyghur population, following an untold number of deaths and injuries that began on July 5, 2009.

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Save Kashgar‘s Old Town!

Society for Threatened Peoples, 1 May 2010

Society for Threatened Peoples — The Old Town of the city of Kashgar, which is over 2000 years old, in the north-west of China is threatened with destruction. In the coming five years about 200,000 people are to be re-housed in so-called  earthquake-proof apartment buildings. The project, which began on 27th February 2009, involves the destruction of 85 percent of the basic fabric, which is centuries old. Kashgar has the reputation of being the most important Islamic town in central Asia in terms of cultural history. Only 15 percent of the old houses are to be retained in the framework of an open-air museum to present to the 1.5 million tourists from home and abroad the old Islamic culture.

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